blvcknvy:

They made ​​fun of your name and you have changed your name.
They made ​​fun of your clothes and you changed clothes.
They made ​​fun of your hair and you have straightened your hair.
They made ​​fun of your skin and you bought skin brighteners. 
They made ​​fun of your languages ​​and you have adopted their own.
They made ​​fun of your religion and you have embraced theirs.
Who taught you to hate the texture of your hair?
Who taught you to hate the color of your skin? to the extent that you bleach to be like the white man.
Who taught you to hate the shape of your nose and the shape of your lips?
Who taught you to hate the top of your head to the soles of your feet?
Who taught you to hate your being? to hate the land of your ancestors, to hate the race you belong to, such a point that you do not want to be next to each other.
When will we realize? When will humanity?

blvcknvy:

They made ​​fun of your name and you have changed your name.

They made ​​fun of your clothes and you changed clothes.

They made ​​fun of your hair and you have straightened your hair.

They made ​​fun of your skin and you bought skin brighteners. 

They made ​​fun of your languages ​​and you have adopted their own.

They made ​​fun of your religion and you have embraced theirs.

Who taught you to hate the texture of your hair?

Who taught you to hate the color of your skin? to the extent that you bleach to be like the white man.

Who taught you to hate the shape of your nose and the shape of your lips?

Who taught you to hate the top of your head to the soles of your feet?

Who taught you to hate your being? to hate the land of your ancestors, to hate the race you belong to, such a point that you do not want to be next to each other.

When will we realize? When will humanity?

(via newmodelminority)

classicladiesofcolor:

Singer Ethel Waters as illustrated by Robert Nippoldt and text by Hans-Jürgen Schaal. Jazz: New York in the Roaring Twenties is a beautifully produced over-sized, cloth-bound walk through the history of Harlem and its transformation from a peaceful village on the outskirts of New York City into “America’s black Paris.”  This book celebrates time and place without ever sugarcoating the often harsh realities and egregious adversities faced by the legendary community of artists who created a uniquely American genre of music.  Read the review here.

classicladiesofcolor:

Singer Ethel Waters as illustrated by Robert Nippoldt and text by Hans-Jürgen Schaal. Jazz: New York in the Roaring Twenties is a beautifully produced over-sized, cloth-bound walk through the history of Harlem and its transformation from a peaceful village on the outskirts of New York City into “America’s black Paris.”  This book celebrates time and place without ever sugarcoating the often harsh realities and egregious adversities faced by the legendary community of artists who created a uniquely American genre of music.  Read the review here.

(via blackgirlsarefromthefuture)

yagazieemezi:

Carrying deeply dark but beautiful visuals, Udueagu is an experimental short film by Nigerian writer Akwaeke Zara Emezi. Captured in Lagos, Nigeria, the haunting film is narrated by Akwaeke herself in Igbo poetic phrases that mesh perfectly with each arresting scene.

Akwaeke’s work can be described as,

Brutal and surreal, it pushes past comfortable morality to honestly explore the margins of humanity.

The film has already been shown at the Chicago Home Theater Festival and is slowly but surely grabbing attention.

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

yagazieemezi:

Out of South Africa comes Mary Sibande recognized for her project called,  Long Live the Dead Queen. The exhibition revolves around a character named Sophie Ntombikayise, a maid inspired from her personal family history of four generations involved in domestic work. 

“Sophie’s eyes are always closed as she dreams and desires things that a maid and her family never had. Sibande created the figure in order to pay tribute to her mother, grandmother and her great-grandmother in a four figure sculpture series.  In this, Sibande too becomes the maid, crafting the history of the women in her family.”

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

mary Sibande Long Live The Dead South Africa